So the story goes

comments 4
All / Coexistence & Harmony

I woke up this morning before the darkness of night had faded. All were silent, except for the wind. It howled while it made its way through gaps between my room windows, quietening as the light of dawn transformed silhouettes into objects.

A gentle rain began to fall—a passing shower really. It washed all it touched, a morning ablution that seemed more ceremonial than seasonal (it’s monsoon in India right now). It cleaned the dust on the pinnate fronds of the Coconut Palm in the garden, leaving the feather-shaped leaflets to glisten in the morning light of the tropical sun that shined as the clouds dispersed.    

This sequence of events is not part of a story. It does not lead to a connected event. The following event was rather incongruent: I walked away from the window, and stood head bent, staring at my phone screen.

This is really how our days are, aren’t they? A sequence of events that are stitched together by our mind. Some events energise us, some enervate us, we forget some and some we hold on to, weaving together our personal stories. We pick and choose the most self-aggrandising events to build our social reputation. We use the sensational ones to create news, and we keep ourselves entertained by repeating the ones that involve others. That’s how we roll—making stories out of events. But, your life, my life, and the lives of all those we read and speak about are not stories. Is the heartbreak you experienced at losing a loved one a story, or can you feel its numbing pain somewhere deep inside? Is the joy you felt at a random act of kindness a story, or does it soothe your weary mind when it replays itself in memory?

Life then is not the narrative in our head. It is being lived through our experiences. Your experiences can caution me, guide me, inspire me, and mine can do likewise for you. This seems like the only worthy exchange between two individuals. Where then is the conflict? We learn from each other and we support each other. Or, we could if we tried, especially given our interdependence on this mutual exchange.

Maybe my experience of the transition from darkness to dawn to sunrise will inspire you to see the lyrical beauty of an ordinary morning, and then we will move on, grateful that we could share an experience. Nothing beyond. Because there’s really little else that can be shared.

“There are those who do not realise that one day we must all die, but those who do realise this settle their quarrels.”

–Dhammapada 1.6   

So the story goes
An ordinary morning

The Author

I am a blog about a story and a book - A story about a dog and dot, a speck of dust actually, and a book titled Kyo and Obi that is gentle on the planet and it can be recycled, taking us back to the start where it all began as a blank sheet of paper ready for its next story.

4 Comments

  1. Lakshmi Krishnan says

    This is beautiful, a simple ordinary morning experience that tells us how our ordinary experiences can influence each others’ lives, teach us, support us. If only we could realize this, there need be no conflict. Such a lovely thought in today’s conflict-seared world!We do of course all know that one day we must all die, and yet we push away acceptance of that reality. Hope the world can settle its quarrels, and I know I should take the first step!

  2. T.S.Ananthu says

    Lovely to read this. Am reminded of a description of reality by William James:

    Our lives are like islands in the sea, or like trees in the forest. The maple and the pine may whisper to each other with their leaves.… But the trees also commingle their roots in the darkness underground, and the islands also hang together through the ocean’s bottom. Just so there is a continuum of cosmic consciousness, against which our individuality builds but accidental fences, and into which our several minds plunge as into a mother-sea or reservoir.

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